Writer's Digest Novel Writing 2017 Download

Writer's Digest Novel Writing 2017 Download

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Writer's Digest Yearbook presents:

NOVEL WRITING 2017

Starting Points

Writers at Work How does your day job help your writing? We asked Writer's Digest readers, and they answered in droves. Compiledby Tyler Moss & Jessica Strawser

30 Days, With Benefits The challenge to write a novel in a month for NaNoWriMo is daunting, but the rewards your writing will reap will last for beyond the 30-day mark. by Grant Faulkner

The Long & Short of ItLearn why those in the long game shouldn't overlook the short form.by Julie Duffy

Start With a BangEngage your readers from the get-go with this countdown to a great Chapter 1.by Gabriela Pereira

Story Building

Beginning With the PastToo much backstory too soon can spell disaster for a story's momentum. But with the right approach, a skillful balance of past and present can enhance your characters and enrich your plot.by David Corbett

Plot TwistersTake your readers for a thrill ride with these 21 strategies for adding tension, momentum and unexpected turns.by Elizabeth Sims

All the FeelsTreat scenes as opportunities to add emotional power to your plot, and your story will rise to a new level. Here's how to do it.by Donald Maass

Character Development

Navigating the POV MinefieldWriting a story from multiple points of view can pay off big, but the shift ing structure can be rife with hidden dangers. Steer clear of these 9 land mines and your story will emerge unscathed.by Steven James

Do Characters Have to Change?Th e old adage that mandates characters must change isn't wrong— but it isn't always right, either. Let the truths here guide you in drawing just the right transformational arc for your story.by David Corbett

For All Intents & PurposesGive your characters intentions, scene by scene, to build tension and propel your plot.by Jordan Rosenfeld

Let's Talk About LoveWhen it comes to romance, dialogue is key in developing the bond between your hero and heroine.by Leigh Michaels

Sidekicks You Can Count OnA good sidekick can be an invaluable asset to your protagonist—and your story. Follow these steps to craft supporting characters that are as unforgettable as your hero.by Elizabeth Sims

Momentum & Inspiration

Rookies of the Year10 debut novelists share how they got their break—along with important insights to help you get yours, too.by Chuck Sambuchino & Tyler Moss

Robert Crais: On the Scene of the Crime With roots in a family of law enforcement officers, an award-winning history in TV writing, and more than a dozen New York Times bestselling novels to his name, Robert Crais is the best kind of criminal mastermind.by Jessica Strawser

Jane Green & Freya North: Pen Pals Childhood friends turned bestselling authors Jane Green and Freya North take us along on their cross-continental journey to show that the writing life is better when it's shared.by Jessica Strawse

Debbie Macomber: Dream Catcher With upwards of 150 titles to her name and 200 million books in print worldwide, Debbie Macomber is as accomplished as they come.by Jessica Strawser

The Final Draft

A Better Approach to Critique GroupsTry these 5 tips to give and receive more helpful feedback.by Steven James

Submission SaviorsAn agent and editor reveal what every writer should know about revision and editing—before you pitch.by Andrea Hurst & Sean Fletcher

The Lowdown on Beta Readers Having a team of beta readers vet your book before submitting to agents can help you work out the kinks—and avoid rejection.by Amy Sue Nathan

The Submission Process

Build Your Bio Landing a short story byline in a literary journal is a boon to any fiction writer's bio. 15 fiction editors at top publications tell you how to do it.Compiled by Baihley Grandison

Agents in the Round Th ese 5 industry pros share what makes them tick—and what sorts of writers they're looking to represent.by Kara Gebhart Uhl

Switch HappensSometimes, author/agent relationships run their course. Whether you're as-yet unpublished or already on the shelf, here's what you need to know about securing new representation.by Teri Brown

Top MarketsTh ese small presses accept unagented submissions in a variety of genres, and frequently earn literary acclaim.by Cris Freese & Tyler Moss

Last Word

The Shortest Submission EverFor one writer, publishing success came aft er months of perseverance—and a single tweet that changed everything.by Rebecca Strong