Track Your Plot at the Scene Level OnDemand Webinar

Track Your Plot at the Scene Level OnDemand Webinar

  • $79.00


ABOUT THE WEBINAR

Some writers prefer writing dramatic action instead of delving into character emotional development. Other writers excel at setting character goals. Some have the knack for creating high tension and conflict and believable suspense. The trick, however, is becoming a master at integrating all of these elements and more into every single scene throughout your story.

Do you know the difference between good and great scenes? A good scene advances the plot of the story, develops the character, contributes to the theme, provides tension and conflict, and/or reflects a change in attitude or circumstances. A great scene does all of these at once.

In this webinar, Martha Alderson will teach you the seven essential elements of scene--time and place, character emotional development, goal, dramatic action, conflict, emotional change, and thematic significance. You'll learn how to maximize each plot element to create powerful scenes at each major turning point in your story.

Explore plot from the scene level and see your story in an entirely new light!

Registrants are invited to bring scenes from their favorite movie, events, or ideas they have for their screenplay to the webinar.

WHAT YOU'LL LEARN:

  • The seven essential elements of scene
  • How to create powerful scenes from the beginning to the middle and the end of your story
  • The difference between character emotional development and emotional change
  • Three of the major turning points found in every story
  • How to create a Scene Tracker, or visual representation of the character emotional development, dramatic action and thematic significance of your story
  • How to use a Scene Tracker to maximize your scenes

WHO SHOULD LISTEN?

  • Beginners to advanced screenwriters
  • Anyone who has ever wanted to write a screenplay
  • Anyone who has ever suffered from plot envy
  • Writers who have written a screenplay and want to evaluate why it didn't make the cut