Writing for Kids & YA (PDF)

Writing for Kids & YA (PDF)

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GETTING STARTED
Saving Your "Rejects"
Lessons in perseverance can come in unexpected packages. Learn how one writer found inspiration in the face of rejection.
BY SUE FLIESS

Stop, Thief!
Think someone stole your idea? Not so fast. Here's what you can learn from two authors and their tale of "simultaneous discovery."
BY EILEEN COOK & LARA ZIELIN

Emerging Voices
New authors share their best advice: how they did it, what they learned, and why you can do it too.
BY CHUCK SAMBUCHINO

So, You Want to Write for Children?
Before you start, banish these 10 misconceptions about writing in the genre.
BY TRACEY E. DILS

Learning the Ropes
Here's how to shape your story, know your readers and plan for success when writing for kids.
BY ALIJANDRA & TAYOPA MOGILNER

Evolving Children's Book Publishing
Use this guide to keep up with trends and find success in a tough market.
BY KELLY MILNER HALLS

KNOWING YOUR MARKET
The Picture Book Big Picture
Learn to write books that kids will love—and that publishers and parents will buy.
BY TRACEY E. DILS

Writing Young Chapter Books
Here's what you need to know about this often overlooked genre.
BY LYNN E. HAZEN

The YA Perspective
Master the teenage voice, and soon you'll really be speaking your reader' language.
BY ANDREW KARRE

Today's YA
Agents and editors tell you what's hot, what's not, and what you need to know to break in.
COMPILED BY JESSICA STRAWSER

LEARNING FROM THE PROS
Crossover Success
Megan McCafferty's recipe for a bestselling YA series? Thirty pages, a dream and some old-fashioned teen angst.
BY LAUREN MOSKO BAILEY

Wicked Magic
Gregory Maguire is a fan favorite with kids and adults alike. Here's why.
BY LAUREN MOSKO BAILEY

Top 10 Things I've Learned Since Becoming a Bestseller
One of the genre's most diverse authors shares her insights.
BY ELLEN HOPKINS

Top 10 Pieces of Writing Advice I've Been Given
Get tips straight from the award-winning author of War Dances.
BY SHERMAN ALEXIE
Top 10 Things Every Aspiring Writer Should Know
Learn from this children's favorite.
BY KIRBY LARSON

Writing in Different Worlds
Meet three-time Newbery Honor author Jacqueline Woodson.
BY LEE WIND

Accidental Success
Rachel Cohn's big break came when she started writing what she wanted to read.
BY AARON HARTZLER

HONING YOUR CRAFT
Picture Book Construction 101
Building a solid frame for your story house.
BY ANN WHITFORD PAUL

Plotting for Young Readers
Learn to use a throughline to maintain your readers' interest and pull them through the story.
BY NANCY LAMB

Hook Readers With Strong Beginnings & Endings
Grab their attention from the start and never let go.
BY SUE BRADFORD EDWARDS

Location, Location, Location
Use these methods to create a strong sense of place.
BY JILL ALEXANDER

Writing Convincing YA Characters
Learn to create unique characters your readers will love (or love to hate).
BY K.L. GOING

The Kids Are All Right
Here's how to keep the focus of your book where it belongs.
BY SUE BRADFORD EDWARDS

Holding Your Story Together
Try these 7 ways to structure your picture book.
BY ANN WHITFORD PAUL

Writing Humor
Tickle young readers'funny bones: 12¾ Ways.
BY DONNA GEPHART

GETTING PUBLISHED
Good Company
Learn what a writing community can do for you.
BY LIN OLIVER

Enter the Agents
Literary reps sound off about what they look for in submissions.
BY JANE FRIEDMAN & KARA GEBHART UHL

Perfecting Your Submission Package
Follow these guidelines for formatting and submitting your children's books.
BY CHUCK SAMBUCHINO & THE EDITORS OF WRITER'S DIGEST

Real YA Queries That Worked
Agents share queries that hooked them—and insights on what made them effective.
COMPILED BY JESSICA STRAWSER

Conferences for the Young at Heart
If you're writing for children or young adults, these events could be red-letter days on your calendar.
BY LINDA FORMICHELLI

Authors Unite Online
Learn how debut authors are sharing support and celebration during the first years.
BY SARA BENNETT WEALER

BACK PAGE
Reject a Hit
Zerna Sharp and William S. Gray's Fun With Dick and Jane
SPOOF-REJECTED BY CHUCK REDMAN